About lobo disease

What is lobo disease?

Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a chronic infectious tropical disease caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The initial infection usually occurs in the lungs, but may also spread to the skin, mucous membranes, and other parts of the body. Specialized cells that line the walls of blood and lymphatic vessels and dispose of cellular waste (reticuloendothelial system) may also be affected by paracoccidioidomycosis. If the patient does not receive treatment, life-threatening complications can occur. Most cases of this disease occur in South and Central America.



What are the symptoms for lobo disease?

Slow-growing symptom was found in the lobo disease condition

Lobomycosis or Lobo disease is basically a bump in the skin, firm swellings, or malignant tumors.

  • Infection occurs through traumatic implantation of the fungus into the skin.
  • The symptoms of paracoccidioidomycosis generally occur from several weeks or months to years after the initial exposure to the fungus.
  • The symptoms of Lobo disease vary according to which areas of the body are infected.
  • In case of pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis, the lungs are affected. Symptoms may include cough, Difficulty breathing (dyspnea), fatigue, and/or chest pain.
  • In some people, the symptoms of paracoccidioidomycosis progress to a condition known as cor pulmonale. Heart disease occurs in this condition.
  • When paracoccidioidomycosis affects the lymphatic system, Swelling of lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy) in the neck and the underarm area (axilla). Infected lymph nodes may become painful and produce Pus (suppuration).


Symptoms
Slow-growing, keloid-like papules, nodules, or Plaques in a limited area on exposed skin
Conditions
Lesions
Drugs
Clofazimine,Dapso



What are the causes for lobo disease?

Lobomycosis or Lobo disease is a fungal infection of the skin. It is basically a bump in the skin, firm swellings, or malignant tumors.

  • Lacazia loboi, a fungus that is found in soil, vegetation, and water, is what causes Lobo disease.
  • The disease is caused by the traumatic implantation of the fungus loboi into the skin and subcutaneous tissue
  • Infection occurs through traumatic implantation of the fungus into the skin.
  • Many cases of Lobo disease occur years after airborne fungal spores are inhaled, although the latency period is not always this long.
  • The fungus may be converted to yeast that spreads to other parts of the body.
  • For people who have a strong immune system of are able to resist the infection from spreading further, the infection is stopped.
  • However, in people with a weak immune system, the fungus goes on to cause disease in one or more parts of the body.
  • Paracoccidioidomycosis sometimes occurs in patients with weakened immune systems (immunocompromised), including those with AIDS.


Symptoms
Slow-growing, keloid-like papules, nodules, or plaques in a limited area on exposed skin
Conditions
Lesions
Drugs
Clofazimine,Dapso



What are the treatments for lobo disease?

Lobomycosis or lobo disease is a persistent fungal skin and subcutaneous tissue infection that is most common in Latin American tropical settings. Lacazia loboi (previously Loboa loboi), a dimorphic fungus found in soil, vegetation, and water, is the causal organism. Infection arises as a result of the fungus's forceful implantation into the skin.

  • Slow-growing, keloid-like papules, nodules, or plaques in a limited area on exposed skin are the most prevalent presentation in people.
  • Lobomycosis can also appear as ulcerated, infiltrative, verrucous, gumma-like, multifocal, or disseminated lesions.
  • Since lobomycosis is the established title for this condition, it has been known by many different other names.
  • Jorge Lobo's disease, Jorge Lobo mycosis, Jorge Lobo blastomycosis, Amazonic pseudolepromatous blastomycosis, miraip or piraip ("burning" in Tupi), Caiabi leprosy, and lacaziosis are among examples.


Treatment

  • This disease has no established treatment. Although a broad surgical excision for small, well-defined early lesions may be successful, relapses are common.
  • The therapy of choice is surgical excision or cryosurgery.
  • Although antifungal treatment has been deemed ineffectual, the use of clofazimine and dapsone in individuals with leprosy and lobomycosis has been shown to ameliorate the latter. This therapy regimen has been utilized to prevent recurrence following surgery, in conjunction with itraconazole.
  • Both surgical excision and cryotherapy have been reported efficient for lobomycosis.
  • Successful medications include clofazimine, itraconazole, and multibacillary therapy for leprosy.


Symptoms
Slow-growing, keloid-like papules, nodules, or plaques in a limited area on exposed skin
Conditions
Lesions
Drugs
Clofazimine,Dapso



What are the risk factors for lobo disease?

The risk factors of lobo disease:

  • Lobo disease is more common among men who work in the woods, including such rubber tappers, bushmen, miners, and Indian men.
  • The painful insertion of the fungus on the skin is recognized as the way through which humans get this infection.
  • The lesions are often keloid-like and affect mostly exposed parts such as the auricles and upper and lower limbs.
  • Individuals who travel to endemic regions with tropical and subtropical climates are especially vulnerable. Human lobomycosis has been reported in nine South American countries, three Central American countries, and two South African cases.
  • The age group of presentation is wide, extending from one to seventy years. It is more common in men, although it is crucial to note that gender is not directly related to the professional aspect. The majority of cases were reported in patients engaged in agricultural, fishing, hunting, or mining occupations.
  • Aside from humans, incidences of lobomycosis have been observed in dolphins; while the likelihood of humans obtaining the disease from dolphins looks minimal, there has been one reported case of disease transfer from a dolphin to its attendant.


Symptoms
Slow-growing, keloid-like papules, nodules, or plaques in a limited area on exposed skin
Conditions
Lesions
Drugs
Clofazimine,Dapso



Is there a cure/medications for lobo disease?

Lobomycosis or lobo disease has no established medications. Although a broad surgical excision for small, well-defined early lesions may be successful, relapses are common.

  • The therapy of choice is surgical excision or cryosurgery.
  • Although antifungal treatment has been deemed ineffectual, the use of clofazimine and dapsone in individuals with leprosy and lobomycosis has been shown to ameliorate the latter.
  • This therapy regimen has been utilized to prevent recurrence following surgery, in conjunction with itraconazole.
  • Since lesions may occur again after surgery, patient follow-up is necessary for a long time before considering it cured.
  • Both surgical excision and cryotherapy have been reported efficient for lobomycosis.
  • Successful medications include clofazimine, itraconazole, and multibacillary therapy for leprosy.


Symptoms
Slow-growing, keloid-like papules, nodules, or plaques in a limited area on exposed skin
Conditions
Lesions
Drugs
Clofazimine,Dapso



Video related to lobo disease